Baby food brand Mamamade reports 300% increase in sales as locked-down parents drive trend for adult standard weaning fare

FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Healthy home-made baby food company Mamamade (which launched in the UK in 2019) has reported a 300% increase in food orders since lockdown commenced in March and continues to grow at 40% MOM.

The brand – built on a desire to offer busy parents precious time and headspace – offers 16 delicious plant-based meals for weaning across three product ranges, all with plant-based recipes.

Having seen explosive growth in the last nine months, the brand recently started distributing from a larger dedicated facility for large scale growth, employing a team of chefs (previously at the likes of Bob Bob Ricard) and nutritionists to deliver restaurant-standard food to the door. Packed with a wide variety of nutrient-rich ingredients, Mamamade pouches can be steamed, microwaved, mashed, or pureed in moments. All meals are pre-prepped and measured to minimise any food waste, making the most of the flavour combinations tailored to babies’ palettes.

The brand has responded to the increase in demand by developing a breakfast range designed for a parent and child to share, something that is a growing trend in weaning. NPD includes Sweet Potato and Cinnamon Porridge and a Blueberry and Lemon Breakfast Bowl, with additional porridges and finger foods set to launch in June. The all-natural, allergen free meals are freshly flash frozen (so nutrients don’t escape) are available via a subscription service and can be ordered digitally via the Mamamade website, directly delivered door-to-door.

Sophie Baron, founder of Mamamade, explains: “As a working parent myself, I spotted a lack of support for busy parents. I have developed Mamamade entirely in response to feedback and data from my customer base, now providing more variety than other baby foods on the market, free from nasties and artificial sugars. Our meals are 100% plant-based, a category which is only set to grow.”