Retail sales show modest growth in November, reports ONS

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Retail sales volumes in November 2010 were 1.1% higher than in November 2009, according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS).

Food stores decreased by 1.3% – this is the fifth consecutive fall, while non-food stores increased by 3.6%.

Within non-food stores there were rises across all sectors, apart from household goods stores which decreased by 5.7%, driven by furniture stores. The largest rise was other stores at 7.2%. Non-store retailing increased by 7.1%.

Between October and November, total sales volume increased by 0.3%. Food stores increased by 0.6% while non-food stores increased by 0.2%. Within non-food stores there were decreases across all sectors apart from other stores which increased by 2%, driven by computers and telecoms equipment. The largest decrease was household goods stores at 1.1%. Non-store retailing decreased by 0.9%.

Sales volume in the three months September to November increased by 0.2%, compared to the previous three months. Food stores decreased by 0.8% while non-food stores increased by 1%. Within non-food stores, the largest decrease was household goods stores at 1.9%, followed by non-specialised stores at 0.7%. The largest increase was other stores at 4.5% followed by textile, clothing and footwear stores at 0.6%. Non-store retailing increased by 1.5%.

Total sales volume in the three months to November was 0.5% higher than the same period a year ago. Food stores decreased by 2% while non-food stores increased by 3.7%. Within non-food stores there were rises across all sectors apart from household goods stores which decreased by 4.5%, driven by furniture stores. The largest rise was other stores at 6.3%. Non-store retailing increased by 9.1%.

The seasonally adjusted value of retail sales for November 2010 was 3.6% higher than in November 2009. For the three months to November 2010, it was 2.7% higher than the same period a year earlier.