Agricultural Forum to discuss food security in light of population growth

FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail
2011 Forum: debating future of agriculture

2011 Forum: debating future of agriculture

The 2011 Congress of the World Agricultural Forum (WAF) will debate how agriculture can be developed to feed a growing world population as the UN estimates the global population will reach 7bn on 31 October 2011.

The WAF Congress, Rethinking Agriculture to sustain a growing global population, takes place from 28 November to 1 December 2011 in Brussels.

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) and others are alarmed the world is running out of agricultural capacity to feed itself and to provide all the other necessary things the land provides. The talk is of improving food security, the WAF reports.

According to the UN’s Department of Economic and Social Affairs, global population is predicted to rise to anywhere between 9bn and 12bn by 2050. 

Jim Bolger, chairman of the Advisory Board of the World Agricultural Forum, said: “If there is one thing which must not be compromised, it is the availability of food. Food shortages lead directly to a disrupted society, no matter where in the world. 

“While the concerns about food security are real, it does not mean we are necessarily facing catastrophe – far from it. The human race is hugely innovative and adaptive and with the right approach, can almost certainly make up any perceived shortfalls. But if history is any guide, it won’t happen by doing things the same old way.”

The 2011 Congress of the World Agricultural Forum (WAF) will address the new ways of feeding the growing global population. This Congress said it focused on rethinking what we do now in agriculture and food production aims to provoke the generation of ideas to solve real problems and not solutions to fit a particular political problem.  

Constituted by the non-profit World Agricultural Forum, the Congresses have a unique record of bringing together speakers and delegates from all walks of life in a neutral environment. Global leaders from the business, political, diplomatic, NGO and academic worlds will be present to think and debate how things can be done differently to improve global food security. As always many delegates will have strong opinions. But being impartial, the Congress said it is open to all ideas and shades of opinion.