Arch & Hook empowers retailers to become entirely sustainable

FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

After launching the world’s first sustainable hanger in 2019 – made from its unique marine plastic material BLUE® – Arch & Hook is now offering retailers groundbreaking innovations across the board in the manufacturing, display and transportation of products. The company creates sustainable alternatives to ‘behind-the-scenes’ goods commonly made from single-use plastics, such as packaging and store furnishings (part of what is known as GNFR – Goods Not For Resale), empowering brands to become entirely sustainable from design to display.

Fully recycled and recyclable materials

Arch & Hook’s thermoplastic material BLUE® is not only entirely recyclable itself, but is made from 100% recycled ocean-bound, post-consumer plastic, collected predominantly from four of the most polluting rivers on earth. Without Arch & Hook’s intervention the majority of this waste would end up in oceans, so BLUE® not only helps to remove scrap plastics, but also stops the creation of more. BLUE®, along with Arch & Hook’s recycled acrylic, metals and organic materials such as FSC®-certified wood, can be manufactured into fully-customisable and entirely sustainable designs that last up to 10 times longer than their plastic counterparts. The company works mostly on custom briefs for the retail supply chain, but also provides off-the-shelf solutions, including furniture, fixtures, and transportation solution AutoBox®.

Collaborations and customisable solutions

Arch & Hook recently teamed up with Nike to help design its new store in Toronto, ensuring everything from the flooring to seating is sustainable, with all furnishings transported flatpack to limit emissions.

“Arch & Hook has been servicing the planet with fully-recycled and recyclable plastic for some time,” Arch & Hook founder and CEO, Sjoerd Fauser, says. “After collecting the post-consumer and post-industrial plastic waste, it goes through a process of technological recycling, including extrusion and granulation, before being transformed into high-quality recycled pellets that can be manufactured into anything.”

Consumers are demanding change

In a recent partnership with WIRED, Arch & Hook conducted an investigation into the environmental impact of retail’s continued reliance on plastic ‘background’ goods. The study included a survey of over 1,000 UK and over 1,000 US consumers in which 82% of UK and 73% of US respondents said they believe it is ‘very important’ that the fashion industry finds alternatives to plastics, and 63% and 67% (respectively) said they would pay more for sustainable brands.

“Arch & Hook’s work with the Conscious Fashion and Lifestyle Network1 has been integral in driving social and environmental impact in the industry,” Lucie Brigham, Chief of Office, UN Partnerships, says. “Manufacturing products that prevent the increase of ‘ocean soup’ – the mixture of plastic and various waste found in the sea – is providing the type of solutions we need.”

Designed to fit the future

With COP26 underlining the need for urgent and meaningful action, but with the fashion industry on course to fall well short of the UN’s updated fashion charter pledge to halve emissions by 2030, companies such as Arch & Hook offer real solutions for positive impact. The reimagined and organic materials can be used to manufacture anything – a fact that shines an unflattering light on brands’ continued use of virgin plastics. Retail must choose products that are designed to fit the future.

“Arch & Hook are trailblazing the path for retailers by providing solutions and systems to implement into their business. As the sector works towards a sustainable recovery, the industry has no choice but to take responsibility for its actions impacting people and the planet. This expansion amplifies that the tools and technology are available to lead an equitable, inclusive, and regenerative sector,” concludes Kerry Bannigan, executive director, Fashion Impact Fund and co-founder, Conscious Fashion and Lifestyle Network.