Food stop is essential part of the festive shopping experience, says British Sandwich Association

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Despite the mayhem of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, Christmas shopping is still an event we like to make a day of. Research from the British Sandwich Association shows nine in 10 people (91.5%) say a food stop in as an essential part of their festive shopping experience.

There’s just a week of shopping days left until Christmas and UK shoppers still look for the experience of a day’s shopping. Integral to that is food. The rise of high street coffee shops, bakeries and other sandwich retailers is helping consumers to enjoy the experience and save time.

Jim Winship, director of the British Sandwich Association, said: “While the world may be turning to digital, some things just can’t. Enjoying a sandwich, a coffee and a little treat is such a simple pleasure. It adds so much to consumer experience on the high street.”

Eight in 10 (82.6%) saying they will grab something on the go while out Christmas shopping. Two thirds (66.8%) of us add in a festive coffee or hot drink, too. And more than half (55%) will also add a Christmassy treat such as a mince pie.

Of course, money is tight this Christmas and does come in to the decision to add these sundries. Two thirds (66.8%) of Britons would have all of the above if money were not object.

Where that purchase is made, however, is a contentious one. 55% of us plump for a trusted chain retailer while 45% opt for independents.

Winship said: “With Click and Collect increasing in popularity and footfall on the High Street down 26% since 2008 delivering an experience will keep shoppers on the high street. This is critical as footfall has disproportionate effect on total spend.

“With a footfall of over 300,000 people per week, High streets see a total spend of some £550m or more. When the footfall rate drops by just 50,000 (to between 250,000 and 299,999) the total spend practically halves to around £270m.”