Success at the London Beer Competition for The Krafty Braumeister

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Hoppediz: winning beer

The Krafty Braumeister won two Silver medals at the fourth edition of the London Beer Competition. The competition took place on Wednesday 17th March and winners were announced on Monday 12th April. Krafty’s two winning beers were Hoppediz and Schwarz & Weiss. Winning a medal at the London Beer Competition is the ultimate seal of approval in the global beer industry.

The Krafty Braumeister is a German brewery based in Leiston, Suffolk. They handcraft beers in small batches using traditional German brewing techniques. Krafty follows Reinheitsgebot, the German purity law of brewing, meaning that the only ingredients they use are malted grains, hops, yeast and water. All of Krafty’s beers are vegan friendly and free from added sugars and supplements.

The goal of London Beer Competition is to award and celebrate beers that beer buyers want to buy. The competition’s judges examine the many emerging and re-discovered styles which intrigue and appeal to all types of beer drinkers. The London Beer Competition recognise quality, where brewing ability and technical expertise receive peer, buyer, writer and beer sommelier accreditation. The judges also award points and medals for both value and packaging.

Krafty’s founder, Uli Schiefelbein, comments, “I am so thrilled that the judges recognised the quality of our purely handcrafted, artisanal beers among all the big players in the brewing world. It is hard work to get recognised in this highly competitive industry. These two medals give me and everyone at The Krafty Braumeister a huge boost to continue what we started three years ago: refreshing beers without supplements, just like the good old days.”

Award-winning Hoppediz is a German brown ale brewed with an exciting mix of barley malts. Traditional hops add subtle spicy tones. The recipe originates from the West German town of Duesseldorf, where people call it “Altbier”. The judges said, “Rich and full bodied with caramel and biscuit aromas giving way to grassy and woody hops on the palate. Balanced combination of spicy notes and sweet flavours.”

Krafty’s second medal winner, Schwarz & Weiss, is a traditional Bavarian Dunkelweizen (dark wheat beer). First, you smell the flavours of roasted and oak-smoked barley malts. Then you savour the moderate spicy, fruity, malty, refreshing wheat-based ale. This premium beer reflects the best yeast and wheat character of a Hefeweizen with the malty richness of a Munich Dunkel. The hop bitterness is low. The judges commented, “Dark roasted notes on the nose with flavours of coffee and winter spices on the palate. High carbonation followed by sweet flavours of raisins, toffee and chocolate.”

There are four main steps that The Krafty Braumeister does differently to most other breweries. Krafty freshly grind the malt grains on brewing day to ensure that the grains’ full flavour ends up in the beer and doesn’t evaporate through long storage. Krafty then use step-infusion to prolong the brewing process and make sure that all the sugars within the grains get into the beer. During mashing, temperatures are increased in stages, ranging from approximately 40°C to 78°C. The sugars found in the beers are solely produced from the grains. They do not add chemicals to speed up the fermentation process, nor do they add finings to clear up the beer’s appearance. Krafty’s beers are also not filtered to ensure that all the natural full flavours and aromas are maintained. Before decanting into bottles and kegs, Krafty adds fresh yeast and unfermented wort into the fermenting vessel, a process called ‘Kraeusening’. This continues the carbonation process and ensures that carbon dioxide is produced naturally in the bottle, which adds refreshing fizziness.